S017_PROC-852.2015

ACHEMA Worldwide News2/2015

means — biobased (and if so, what proportion of a product has to come from biomass), biodegradable or bioderived. Clear definitions are needed to set goals for public procurement, but also to inform the general public and consumers about the benefits of the respective products. Logistics for fossil resources have been long established and are facilitated by the fact that most fossil sources are punctiform whereas biomass is grown on large areas. A balance will have to be found between the economically feasible size of a biorefinery and the necessary effort to ship raw material there and decentralized processing plants close to the agricultural sites. The current value chains in the bioeconomy need to be intensified and more closely interlinked. Players that haven’t cooperated before need to be brought together, creating new business models adapted to the specific characteristics of the bioeconomy. Necessary measures include the creation of sustainability criteria for biomass use for chemicals and energy, standards and norms defining biobased products and services. The availability of sustainable biomass has to be ensured. This requires adequate agricultural structures taking into account a broad range of potential biomass sources and trade agreements enabling the import from regions with abundant biomass. Sustainability criteria have to be extended to topics such as soil fertility, water management and the longterm economic feasibility of the process. Recently, the EU bioeconomy has been joined by a larger sibling, the circular economy. The bioeconomy is seen by many as an integral part of the circular economy, when it deals with waste, recycling, multiuse in form of cascades, and when closing value chains. Others insist on the A special edition from PROCESS dles need yet to be overcome. Politics, industry and science should therefore not relax in their efforts to promote the bioeconomy and create favourable conditions for the transformation. In the context of a circular economy, it is still essential to have an explicit focus on the bioeconomy. We have come a long way over the last three years; but transforming a whole economy is a marathon rather than a sprint. Let’s not stop at middistance. n 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. complementarity of both forms of an economy because of the unique features of the bioeconomy like carbonneutrality, renewability and potentials for new properties of materials, which are found in renewable biological resources — the primary resources of the bioeconomy. Both economies should therefore join forces and potentials. Conclusion: The bioeconomy in Europe is on the verge of success, but to ensure the final breakthrough, a couple of hurdocument3645228075377534737.


ACHEMA Worldwide News2/2015
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